Early Railway’s

2013 National Railway Museum York - The Great Gathering - Shutt End Colliery Railway 0-4-0 steam locomotive AgenoriaIn stark contrast to the previous blog post looking at modern traction in the National Railway Museum, York (click here to read more), today we look at locomotives and carriages, some of which are replica’s, that remind us of the early days of railways in the UK.  We begin with elderly 1829 built Shutt End Colliery Railway 0-4-0 steam locomotive Agenoria.2013 National Railway Museum York - The Great Gathering - Shutt End Colliery Railway 0-4-0 steam locomotive AgenoriaA product of Foster Rastrick and Co of Stourbridge, Agenoria served until withdrawal in 1864.  Agenoria is a contemporary of the Rocket and if anything demonstrates how advanced The Rocket was.  Nevertheless, it’s a very significant locomotive and a rare survivor of the early days of steam powered railways.  It isn’t the oldest surviving steam locomotive however, that accolade goes to another member of the National collection, Puffing Billy, which can be seen in the Science Museum, London (click here for more).  Agenoria’s biggest claim to fame is arguably being very similar to the “Stourbridge Lion”, the first locomotive to run in the USA.  The Stourbridge Lion also survives, appropriately enough at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore, USA.

2013 National Railway Museum York - The Great Gathering - Shutt End Colliery Railway 0-4-0 steam locomotive AgenoriaThe next locomotive we look at is relatively modern.  The Furness Railway’s 1846 built Number 3 “Old Coppernob” was so named after it’s large copper “haystack” firebox.  It is the only surviving bar-frame inside cylinder designed steam locomotive of Edward Bury.  It was built by Bury, Curtis, and Kennedy of Liverpool and is painted in the Furness Railway’s Indian Red livery.

2013 National Railway Museum York - The Great Gathering - Furness Railway No3 Old CoppernobWe now look at some replica’s, starting with a replica built in 1938 by the LMS of an 1838 traveling post office carriage.  Even though a replica, it is older than many of the other exhibits of the National Railway Museum!

2013 National Railway Museum York - The Great Gathering - Royal Mail 282693Far more famous are the replica’s of Stephenson’s 1829 Rainhill Trials winning locomotive, The Rocket.

2013 National Railway Museum York - The Great Gathering - Stephenson's Rocket Replica (cut-away)Stephenson's Rocket Replica (cut-away)The first replica, currently located in the Great Hall of the National Railway Museum, York has shared a similar fate to 35029 Ellerman Lines and has been sectioned to show it’s inner workings (click here to read more).

2013 National Railway Museum York - The Great Gathering - Stephenson's Rocket Replica (cut-away)This replica is also fairly elderly and was built in 1935.  Although the original remains of the Rocket can be found in the Science Museum, London (click here for more), the replica’s are in many ways better representations of how The Rocket would have appeared in 1829.  This replica can be found paired with a 1930 built replica of a 1st class “Traveller” Liverpool and Manchester Railway coach.

2013 National Railway Museum York - The Great Gathering - Replica Liverpool & Manchester Railway carriageThe second replica of the Rocket is in working order and often visits different parts of the country.  This locomotive was built in 1982.

2013 National Railway Museum York - The Great Gathering - Stephenson's Rocket ReplicaWhoever said that “New Build’s” are a modern phenomenon?!

2013 National Railway Museum York - The Great Gathering - Stephenson's Rocket ReplicaFinally, we’ll leave you with a statue of George Stephenson, who looks out over the Great Hall of the world’s biggest railway museum in the world.  Which is rather appropriate for “Father of Railways”, I’m sure you’ll agree!

2013 National Railway Museum York - The Great Gathering - The Great Hall George Stephenson statueTo read about other exhibits to be found in the National Railway Museum during this visit in 2013, please click here.